art ~ spirit ~ transformation
e*lix*ir

e*lix*ir   #4
autumn / winter 2016
 

TABLE OF CONTENTS


Editorial

  • The Spiritual Lives of Children

  • Fiction

  • The Imperfect Pilgrim
    by Ron Tomanio
  • “Maggie’s Forever Friend”
    by Patti Rae Tomarelli
  • The Red Roan Stallion
    by Beverlee Patton

  • Poetry

  • Three Poems
    by Susan Engle
  • “Advice to a Daughter”
    by Sandra Lynn Hutchison

  • Picture Books

  • The Painting
    by Negar Yazdani

  • Essays

  • Two Decades of Spirit of Children: A Retrospective
    by Allison Grover Khoury
  • Brilliant Star: Looking Back on 36 Years of an Award-Winning Children’s Magazine
    by Susan Engle

  • Interviews

  • Interview with Mary Victoria, author of Chronicles of the Tree

  • Looking Back on Books

  • Lilly and Peggy
    by Ronald Tomanio
  • Maggie Celebrates Ayyám-i-Há
    by Patti Rae Tomarelli
  • Kamal’s Day
    by Leona Hosack

  • Art

  • Paintings
    by Jeannie Hunt

  • Translations

  • “He is God! O God,I am an innocent child.”
    translated by Shahin Mowzoon

  • Voices of Iran

  • Children of Destiny
    by Basir Samimi


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    Lilly and Peggy

    by RONALD TOMANIO

    Review by MILISSA BOYER KAFES

    Lilly Fenwick lives in Maine with her parents, Sharon and Frank, and her dog Peggy, an English Setter. It is Lilly’s birthday. Both she and Peggy were born on the same day, Naw-Ruz — the Bahá’í New Year — nine years before. Every year, Lilly makes a Naw-Ruz bottle, inserting a quotation from the Bahá’í writings and her contact information, and throws it into the ocean. She hopes someone will, someday, respond to the message.

    Tragically, Peggy dies after being hit by a car, even after Lilly prays very hard. Lilly becomes very depressed, even when she is given a new puppy named Beatrice, by her Uncle Harold. It is only after receiving a response to one of her Naw-Ruz messages that Lilly understands that remembering the love we have for someone who has died is the very best kind of memory.

    Ronnie Tomanio’s story of love, loss, and renewal is a beautiful testimony to the true meaning of Naw-Ruz: the joy that comes with new life, be it a new puppy or a renewed conviction in one’s faith.